How to Edit & Export High Quality Instagram TV (IGTV) Videos using Premiere Pro

How to Edit & Export High Quality Instagram TV (IGTV) Videos using Premiere Pro


– Hey guys, my name is Matt Johnson, and today I wanted to
share with you how to edit, export, and upload
high-quality vertical videos for Instagram TV using Adobe Premiere Pro. So let’s jump right into Premiere. Incidentally, before we get started here, I have created a sequence preset as well as an export settings preset, which you can download
for free if you sign up for my email newsletter at the
link down in the description. That should save you a ton of time if you don’t
wanna listen to me rant and ramble through this entire
tutorial about Instagram. Back to Premiere, first we
need to create a video sequence that matches up with histogram’s
vertical video resolution, and whenever Instagram TV was launched, there was a ton of hype leading up to it. People were like, Instagram’s gonna be HD. It might even be 4k, it was crazy. Everybody was super hyped. I’m sorry to say that all
of those rumors were false, because Instagram is
actually not HD resolution. Any video that you upload to Instagram, regardless of the resolution, if you download it after
uploading to check the resolution that Instagram is playing it back at, it is currently 640 by 1136. Not HD. Not even 720p HD. The good news is that with IGTV, Instagram has made major changes
to the compression quality of their videos, meaning that you’re gonna see much less artifacts and muddiness and weirdness with IGTV videos versus traditional Instagram profile videos. So things are moving
in the right direction, but what does all this mean? Should you be taking all of your 1080p and 4k video clips and downscaling them to 640 by 1136 before
unloading them to Instagram? No. You shouldn’t be. What I’ve found is that Instagram doesn’t care very much about what resolution a video
that you are uploading. It can handle a variety of
resolutions pretty well. What does matter is the
bitrate of your video, which we will talk about
in just a little bit. We also need to talk about video length. The minimum video length for
an IGTV video is 15 seconds, and the maximum video length
is one of two options. If you have less than
10,000 Instagram followers, your IGTV video lengths
are gonna be limited to what Instagram claims is 10 minutes, but in my testing, it’s actually nine minutes and 59 seconds. If you try to upload an
exactly 10 minute video clip, it’s gonna say it’s too long, so make sure you are saving
an extra second there. Alternatively, if you have more than 10,000 Instagram followers, then you’re gonna be able
to upload video clips up to what Instagram says
is one hour in length, which, as I said earlier, is actually 59 minutes and 59 seconds, because that extra second
can really mess things up. But if your hour-long video is coming down to one extra second, then you might need to reconsider how you’re editing
your videos, just saying. So in summary, the resolution that I recommend that you use in Premiere for Instagram TV is 1080 by 1920, and we’re gonna set up a
sequence for that right now. First, here in Premiere, I want you to press Ctrl + N or Command + N if you’re on a Mac, and that’s gonna open up
the new sequence dialog box. Then I want you to go
up here to digital SLR, 1080p, DSLR 1080p24. Next, we’re gonna go up here to settings and we’re gonna make one
change to this preset. For a frame size, we’re
gonna change the frame size from 1920 horizontal to 1080 horizontal, and for vertical, we’re gonna
change it to 1920 vertical. The rest of this can all stay the same. Because my video footage is
currently 23.976, you can see that the clips I’m gonna using are also 23.976, so
this sequence matches up with my video footage. Lastly, I recommend that
you save your presets, so you can go back and
use again in the future. So select Save Preset, and let’s call this IGTV
Vertical 1080 by 1920 23.976. That way, I can remember
all of the settings that I need for this video. Let’s hit OK. Here in the sequence presets under custom, you can see the preset that we’ve created. So let’s now name this sequence
IGTV Vertical Tutorial, yeah, that’s a good name. Hit OK, and that’s gonna
create our new sequence. Let’s start here with
this mavicpor video clip that I’ve rendered here
to be 1080 by 1920. I’m gonna select it and drag
it down here to the timeline, and as you can see, because
the clip already matches up with the resolution and
frame rate of my sequence, it matches perfectly. And this video clip is a good example if you are say filming videos with your phone in portrait mode for example. They’re already gonna
be in this orientation, so the only work that
you’re really gonna need to do is potentially if you’re filming at a higher resolution, you may need to scale up or
scale down your video clip. And you can do that by going up here to effect controls with the clip selected, and you can go here to scale and adjust the scaling of your video clip. Editing vertical video clips
for IGTV is pretty easy, but what if you had a
horizontal video clip. Let’s go over here to
this Phantom four clip that I shot in isolated horizontal and drag it down here to the timeline. And what you’re gonna notice is that’s got some crazy black
bars on the top and bottom. To remove these black bars, we need to select the video clip and go up to effect controls, and you can see under scale, it’s currently auto set to 28.1, so we’re gonna
start dragging this up, and we’re gonna bring it up to 89, that fills up the entire screen properly, but unfortunately, has majorly cut off the sides of our video. The good news is that if you
need to adjust this framing so that it fits better, you can go up here to the position and you can select this 540 here and drag it left and right and you can see you can adjust the framing of your shot. So I think about right here, actually put in this couple on
the right side a little bit, looks a little better. Now, you’re telling me, Matt, I know that I should unhorizontal, but I want my whole video to be visible. Is there any way that I can possibly do that without having to
shrink the video down and have crazy black bars
on the top and bottom? Well, I do have one other option for you. I’m gonna set this clip
back to the way it was, so 540 by 960, at 28.1 scale, and then I’m gonna go
down here to rotation, and I’m gonna change the
rotation to 90 degrees, which, as you can see,
hey, that flips the video. Cool. Now let’s go over here to scale, and let’s start dragging up the scale, and look at that, if you
turn your head to the side, it’s filling everything up properly. The pro of doing things this way is yes, your video’s gonna fill the entire screen. The con is that if people are watching your video vertically, they’re gonna have to
turn their phone sideways, and studies have shown
that people are lazy and don’t enjoy doing that. So there is a greater chance that people are going
to skip over your video. Also, the video controls are still gonna be on the right side, it’s not super intuitive, because Instagram is really wanting you to make things vertical. The last thing that you need
to know about the resolution of IGTV video clips is that it appears that Instagram
TV can cut off 5 to 10% of the edges of the video
clip depending on what screen you’re watching it on. My recommendation to you is that if you have any text or other important video information, do not put it right up against the edge of your video screen, because there is a greater chance that it could be cut off depending on what screen it’s being watched on. It is now time to export this video, and for it there for being 30 seconds of darkness at the beginning of the video, I’m gonna go here to the very
beginning of the first clip and I’m gonna press i to set my in-point. And I’m gonna go here to the
very ending of the last clip, and I’m gonna press o to set my out-point. Next, I’m gonna press Ctrl + M or Command + M if you’re on a Mac, and that’s gonna bring up the
export settings dialog box. Moving down to the settings here, for format, you’re gonna wanna
select H.264, and for preset, I’m gonna select Match
Source – High Bitrate. You can select that or
really any other preset, it does not matter, because we are gonna be customizing the preset completely down below. So for now, I’m gonna select
Match Source – High Bitrate. For output name, this is very important because this is where your
video is going to be saved. I’ve had a lot of people
commenting saying, Matt, where’s my video saved? I don’t know where it went. You need to select where
you want it to be outputted. So we’re gonna click on this title here, and this opens up the folder where I have all of my project files. I’m gonna select New folder, and I’m gonna name it
Renders, go into that folder. And then, I’m going to name this IGTV Vertical Tutorial, and hit Save. Next, make sure export video
and export audio is checked, so you are actually
exporting both of those. And let’s go down here to the video tab. Under basic video settings, you’re gonna wanna make sure
that your width is set to 1080 and your height is set to 1920, just like our sequence settings. If these numbers are not correct, you can go over here to
select this checkbox, and then change the numbers accordingly. And if your numbers
are changing strangely, make sure there’s a little slash through this chain-link icon here. All the rest of these settings are correct and match up with my video clip settings. If your video clip settings are different, you need to change them, you can always press the
checkbox here to do that. Also make sure that Render
at Maximum Depth is checked, that will increase your video quality. Under encoding settings here, I recommend unchecking this box and changing the profile
from main to high. And then for the level, leaving it at 4.1. Next, let’s scroll down here
some to Bitrate Settings, arguably the most important part of this entire tutorial is the bitrate, because that is what is
gonna affect the quality of your video the most. Setting a higher bitrate can mean a higher quality video file, but it can also result in a
much larger video file size. So let’s go to Instagram’s own help page to determine the maximum file size that we can use for a video. Here on Instagram’s own help page, under what are the video
upload requirements for IGTV, you can see this section right here. The maximum file size for videos that are 10 minutes or
less is 650 megabytes. The maximum file size for videos up to 60 minutes is 5.4 gigabytes. That is a lie, because, let’s go over here to my
Instagram profile page. You can follow me if you want to. And I’m gonna go here to the IGTV tab, and I’m gonna click Upload, and you can see here are the
video upload instructions. Your video must be vertical, between 15 seconds and 60 minutes long, an MP4 file and less than 3.6 gigabytes. Instagram over here in the help page was telling me less than 5.4 gigabytes. Why is this telling me 3.6? Well, if you try to upload a video clip that is 5.4 gigabytes, it does not work. Instagram will tell you that
the video file is too big. So you need to use a video file that’s less than 3.6 gigabytes if you want it to upload properly. And 3.6 gigabytes is kind of weird too, because until I start
uploading video clips, there were about 3.4 gigabytes. They did not want to
upload properly to IGTV. It was telling me they were too big. So keep that in mind. If you have a longer video clip, make sure that it is less
then 3.4 gigabytes if you have the ability to upload up to a 60 minute long video clip. Incidentally, you’re telling me, okay, Matt, that doesn’t matter. I don’t even have 10,000 followers, but what about this here? The maximum file size for videos that are 10 minutes or
less is 650 megabytes. Next you’re gonna be
telling me that’s a lie too. Well, it is. I am sorry. Because, here is another
Instagram account that I created that has less than 10,000 followers and here are the instructions. Your video must be vertical, between 15 seconds and 10 minutes long, an MP4 file, and less than 3.6 gigabytes. There is no 650 megabyte
limit if you don’t have at least 10,000 followers. Does not exist, do not trust help article. As long as your video is
approximately 3.4 gigabytes or less, you’ll be fine. Back to Premiere and to
your bitrate settings. Under Bitrate Encoding, you’re gonna change it to CBR, which stands for constant bitrate. This means that Premiere will
be applying less compression to the video which means that whenever it is unloaded to IGTV, it should have less artifacts and other weirdness
whenever it is compressed. For your Target Bitrate, you’re gonna set it to
7.5 megabits per second, which, in all of my testing, I’ve found that to be high
enough to prevent artifacts or other weirdness in my IGTV video clips, but also low enough that even if I’m uploading a 60 minute
long video to IGTV, it will be under the 3.4
gigabyte max file size. Keep in mind this bitrate
may need some tweaking. If you’re noticing that your video isn’t quite as sharp as you would like it to be, or it has some artifacts, feel free to increase it
to 10 megabits per second, even 20 if you need to to see if your video quality improves. Also, if your video is getting close to the one hour long maximum length, you may run into issues where the file size is getting
a little bit too large. So you may have to drop your bitrate down to seven megabits per second, maybe 6.5 even, to make sure that it fits into that 3.4
gigabyte max file size. Lastly, go down here and make sure that Use Maximum Render
Quality is checked because that can improve the
quality of your video. Next, let’s go up here to audio, and if your video has audio, you’re gonna want to use these settings. I use AAC, with a sample
rate of 48,000 hertz, my channel set to stereo, audio quality set to high, of course. And a bitrate of 320 kilobits per second with the precedence for bitrate. Last thing you need to do is save these export settings as a preset, so you do not need to go through and type them in every single time that you are exporting a video. So under preset here, we’re gonna go here and
select this little down arrow that says Save Preset, and let’s name this
IGTV Vertical 1080×1920 23.976 7.5mbps CBR. And let’s hit OK. Now, if you need to export
this video in the future, you can select H.264, and then select your
present from the drop-down, and save yourself from
having to go through and type all this in. It is now time finally
to export this video, and you can either export
it by clicking Export here, which will export it
directly in Adobe Premiere, or I prefer to do it, I prefer to select Queue, which is going to open
up Adobe Media Encoder. Then, I can go up here
and press this green play button to begin rendering my video, and I can even minimize Media Encoder, and continue editing videos in Premiere while my video
renders in the background. Now that my video’s done rendering, it is time to upload it to IGTV. So I’m gonna select this
output file right here, and that is gonna open up the folder that has my video clip in it. Next, you’re gonna open
up your web browser, now to get to your Instagram
profile page and log in. Then here under the IGTV tab,
you’re going to click Upload. Next, you’re gonna go
down here to your folder that has your video file that you opened, and you’re gonna drag it to the drag-and-drop video file section where it’ll begin to upload to IGTV. Lastly, you need to upload a cover photo for your IGTV video, and this is very important, because once you set this cover photo, you cannot go and change it afterwards, so make sure that you do it right. Strange enough, whenever I
try to uploading a cover photo that was 1080 by 1920, I found that IGTV was cropping
off the edges of it, so what I recommend doing
is opening up Photoshop, and making a new project
with the width of 640 and a height of 1136. Title that, and hit Create. This resolution should
result in a cover photo that is cropped off on the edges. And here is one that I whipped up. We’re gonna export this photo, and I’m gonna navigate back over here to my IGTV cover page and click Edit. Here’s my exported cover photo, I’m gonna select it and
click Open, and there it is. Not cropped, looking good, and this post is now
ready to be published. I don’t want to actually post
this to my IGTV page though, I feel like, my followers would
be like, what is this video? He’s doing pretty drunk shots? What’s going on? So I’m just gonna click Save here, and there’s my video in Drafts. I can click it, click Edit, and whenever I’m ready, I can click Post. Congratulations. Your video is now live on IGTV, and available in the
highest quality possible. Thank you so much for watching. I hope this video has been helpful to you and given you some great insight into how to work through
the whole IGTV process. As always, if you have
any questions or comments, please feel free to leave one below or get in touch with me through
my website, whoismatt.com. I also have a ton of other
videos all about export settings, so if you want to know how to export to regular
Instagram video profile pages, which is different than this, or if you wanna know how to
upload to YouTube or Facebook, or Vimeo, I will link to that video player step in the corner, and down in the description
for you to check out. It is also a massive, whoo, probably 3.4 roughly
gigabyte file sized helped me if you would consider liking this video and subscribing if you
want to see more videos like this in the future. I also have a ton of links
down in the description of this video, to my Instagram page, which has videos like this, to my Facebook page, where
I post news and updates, to one-on-one consulting with
me, and a lot of other stuff, so if you wanna check that out, that’s down in the description, thank you so much for
watching, and have a great day.

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